FeedCreator 1.7.12(BH)Geograph Britain and IrelandImages, in 51:31.0365N, 0:28.7567W (127 in total)https://www.geograph.org.uk/search.php?i=144115610https://www.geograph.org.uk/feed/results/144115610.jsonhttps://www.geograph.org.uk/feed/results/144115610/2.jsonhttps://s1.geograph.org.uk/templates/basic/img/logo.gif2021-10-25T04:32:46+00:00Array ( [0] => stdClass Object ( [title] => TQ0580 : Station Road bridge, West Drayton [description] => The first West Drayton station (1838-1884) was to the left of the bridge. The current station is to the right of it. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6940315 [author] => Nigel Thompson [guid] => 6940315 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/84225 [date] => 1629649651 [imageTaken] => 2021-08-20 [dateUpdated] => 1629704118 [tags] => top:Business, Retail, Services?top:City, Town centre?top:Public buildings and spaces?top:Railways?top:Roads, Road transport?subject:bridge?type:Geograph [lat] => 51.509810 [long] => -0.474260 [thumb] => https://s3.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/94/03/6940315_9ccebb35_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => TQ0580 : Station Road bridge, West Drayton by Nigel Thompson [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [1] => stdClass Object ( [title] => TQ0580 : Packet Boat Marina [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6798290 [author] => Mark Percy [guid] => 6798290 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/18030 [date] => 1617658571 [imageTaken] => 2021-04-04 [dateUpdated] => 1617718382 [tags] => top:Canals?type:Geograph?subject:marina [lat] => 51.517555 [long] => -0.482072 [thumb] => https://s2.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/79/82/6798290_027a5cb1_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => TQ0580 : Packet Boat Marina by Mark Percy [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [2] => stdClass Object ( [title] => TQ0580 : Slough Arm junction [description] => A narrowboat emerges from the Slough Arm onto the main line of the Grand Union Canal. The extension to Slough was completed in 1882 to serve the brick-making industry. The last commercial traffic was carried in 1960, but as plans to fill it in were opposed locally, the stretch was re-opened in 1975 and has remained in use since. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6797985 [author] => Mark Percy [guid] => 6797985 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/18030 [date] => 1617645874 [imageTaken] => 2021-04-04 [dateUpdated] => 1617718237 [tags] => top:Canals?subject:canal junction?type:Geograph [lat] => 51.517352 [long] => -0.480350 [thumb] => https://s1.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/79/79/6797985_ae9b0f21_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => TQ0580 : Slough Arm junction by Mark Percy [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [3] => stdClass Object ( [title] => TQ0580 : Slough Arm / Frays River aqueduct [description] => The aqueduct carries the Slough Arm of the Grand Union Canal over Fray's River. The Slough Arm is a short branch from the Grand Union Main Line. It was opened in 1882 to serve the brick-making industry. The last commercial traffic was carried in 1960, but as the plans to fill it in were opposed locally, the stretch was re-opened in 1975 and has remained in use since. Fray's River is a man-made watercourse diverting some of the waters of the River Colne - effectively a long mill stream. It is named after John Fray a 15th century owner of Cowley Hall. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6797977 [author] => Mark Percy [guid] => 6797977 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/18030 [date] => 1617645511 [imageTaken] => 2021-04-04 [dateUpdated] => 1617714543 [tags] => top:Canals?subject:aqueduct?type:Geograph [lat] => 51.516930 [long] => -0.483880 [thumb] => https://s1.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/79/79/6797977_ddd385d0_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => TQ0580 : Slough Arm / Frays River aqueduct by Mark Percy [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [4] => stdClass Object ( [title] => TQ0580 : Modern Flats in Trout Road [description] => Trout road comes off the High Street and leads to a recycling site at a dead-end. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6227560 [author] => James Emmans [guid] => 6227560 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/68394 [date] => 1564852860 [imageTaken] => 2019-08-02 [dateUpdated] => 1564925417 [tags] => top:City, Town centre?top:Housing, Dwellings?top:Roads, Road transport?type:Geograph [lat] => 51.514160 [long] => -0.476853 [thumb] => https://s0.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/22/75/6227560_f47880d7_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => TQ0580 : Modern Flats in Trout Road by James Emmans [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [5] => stdClass Object ( [title] => TQ0580 : Yiewsley - St Stevens Road [description] => Road close to Yiewsley town centre. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6227443 [author] => James Emmans [guid] => 6227443 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/68394 [date] => 1564845942 [imageTaken] => 2019-08-02 [dateUpdated] => 1564914473 [tags] => top:Housing, Dwellings?top:Roads, Road transport?type:Geograph [lat] => 51.513227 [long] => -0.474290 [thumb] => https://s3.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/22/74/6227443_c2f762f7_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => TQ0580 : Yiewsley - St Stevens Road by James Emmans [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [6] => stdClass Object ( [title] => TQ0580 : Beeches Way approaching West Drayton [description] => The Beeches Way was developed by the Iver and District Countryside Association and connects the River Thames at Cookham with the Grand Union Canal at West Drayton. It passes through several ancient woodlands now designated as SSSIs, including part of Burnham Beeches and the village of Stoke Poges. For more information see https://www.ldwa.org.uk/ldp/members/show_path.php?path_name=Beeches+Way This view is of the final stretch between the Slough Arm of the Grand Union Canal and the Grand Union Canal itself at West Drayton. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5958776 [author] => Marathon [guid] => 5958776 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/43806 [date] => 1540903147 [imageTaken] => 2018-10-24 [dateUpdated] => 1541003198 [tags] => top:Paths?top:Woodland, Forest?Beeches Way?type:Geograph?Long distance path [lat] => 51.513540 [long] => -0.484512 [thumb] => https://s0.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/05/95/87/5958776_2e59878b_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => TQ0580 : Beeches Way approaching West Drayton by Marathon [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [7] => stdClass Object ( [title] => TQ0580 : Grand Union Canal, Slough Arm : Packet Boat Marina [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5912054 [author] => Jim Osley [guid] => 5912054 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/11136 [date] => 1537398687 [imageTaken] => 2018-09-19 [dateUpdated] => 1620684829 [tags] => top:Canals?type:Geograph [lat] => 51.517916 [long] => -0.482204 [thumb] => https://s2.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/05/91/20/5912054_d869afc4_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => TQ0580 : Grand Union Canal, Slough Arm : Packet Boat Marina by Jim Osley [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [8] => stdClass Object ( [title] => TQ0580 : The Grand Union Canal at Yiewsley [description] => This section of the Grand Union Canal from the River Thames at Brentford was opened in 1794. It was the first section of what was originally called the Grand Junction Canal. Its purpose was to provide a new, shorter and quicker transport route between London and Birmingham by connecting with a network of canals at Braunston near Daventry. When the canal reached Braunston in 1805 it cut 60 miles off the shortest alternative route. To the east of West Drayton the canal follows the Great Western Main Line but then the canal swings away to the north-west as it heads up to Uxbridge. This is south of Packet Boat Lane looking back to where the Slough Arm of the Grand Union Canal leaves the main line of the canal just ahead. The towpath is followed by the London LOOP. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5868204 [author] => Marathon [guid] => 5868204 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/43806 [date] => 1533834819 [imageTaken] => 2018-08-08 [dateUpdated] => 1533931702 [tags] => top:Canals?top:Paths?canal towpath?type:Cross Grid?long distance path:London Loop [lat] => 51.517804 [long] => -0.480479 [thumb] => https://s0.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/05/86/82/5868204_623977b5_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => TQ0580 : The Grand Union Canal at Yiewsley by Marathon [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [9] => stdClass Object ( [title] => TQ0580 : The Hobbit at West Drayton [description] => This section of the Grand Union Canal from the River Thames at Brentford was opened in 1794. It was the first section of what was originally called the Grand Junction Canal. Its purpose was to provide a new, shorter and quicker transport route between London and Birmingham by connecting with a network of canals at Braunston near Daventry. When the canal reached Braunston in 1805 it cut 60 miles off the shortest alternative route. To the east of West Drayton the canal follows the Great Western Main Line but here the canal swings away to the north-west as it heads up to Uxbridge. The towpath is followed by the London LOOP. Presumanbly the owner of this narrowboat, moored just west of Yiewsley High Street, is a Tolkien fan. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5861862 [author] => Marathon [guid] => 5861862 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/43806 [date] => 1533226548 [imageTaken] => 2018-08-01 [dateUpdated] => 1533248759 [tags] => top:Canals?top:Paths?type:Cross Grid?long distance path:London Loop?narrowboat?towpath [lat] => 51.511971 [long] => -0.474476 [thumb] => https://s2.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/05/86/18/5861862_08b4d35e_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => TQ0580 : The Hobbit at West Drayton by Marathon [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [10] => stdClass Object ( [title] => TQ0580 : The London LOOP at Yiewsley [description] => This section of the Grand Union Canal from the River Thames at Brentford was opened in 1794. It was the first section of what was originally called the Grand Junction Canal. Its purpose was to provide a new, shorter and quicker transport route between London and Birmingham by connecting with a network of canals at Braunston near Daventry. When the canal reached Braunston in 1805 it cut 60 miles off the shortest alternative route. To the east of West Drayton the canal follows the Great Western Main Line but here the canal swings away to the north-west as it heads up to Uxbridge. The towpath is followed by the London LOOP. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5861858 [author] => Marathon [guid] => 5861858 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/43806 [date] => 1533226310 [imageTaken] => 2018-08-01 [dateUpdated] => 1533248726 [tags] => top:Canals?top:Paths?type:Geograph?long distance path:London Loop?towpath [lat] => 51.513353 [long] => -0.477024 [thumb] => https://s2.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/05/86/18/5861858_dbfe06f0_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => TQ0580 : The London LOOP at Yiewsley by Marathon [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [11] => stdClass Object ( [title] => TQ0580 : The Grand Union Canal at Yiewsley [description] => This section of the Grand Union Canal from the River Thames at Brentford was opened in 1794. It was the first section of what was originally called the Grand Junction Canal. Its purpose was to provide a new, shorter and quicker transport route between London and Birmingham by connecting with a network of canals at Braunston near Daventry. When the canal reached Braunston in 1805 it cut 60 miles off the shortest alternative route. To the east of West Drayton the canal follows the Great Western Main Line but here the canal swings away to the north-west as it heads up to Uxbridge. The towpath is followed by the London LOOP. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5861856 [author] => Marathon [guid] => 5861856 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/43806 [date] => 1533226207 [imageTaken] => 2018-08-01 [dateUpdated] => 1533248721 [tags] => top:Canals?top:Paths?type:Geograph?long distance path:London Loop?towpath [lat] => 51.513444 [long] => -0.477165 [thumb] => https://s0.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/05/86/18/5861856_f9acd2f3_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => TQ0580 : The Grand Union Canal at Yiewsley by Marathon [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [12] => stdClass Object ( [title] => TQ0580 : The Grand Union Canal at Yiewsley [description] => This section of the Grand Union Canal from the River Thames at Brentford was opened in 1794. It was the first section of what was originally called the Grand Junction Canal. Its purpose was to provide a new, shorter and quicker transport route between London and Birmingham by connecting with a network of canals at Braunston near Daventry. When the canal reached Braunston in 1805 it cut 60 miles off the shortest alternative route. To the east of West Drayton the canal follows the Great Western Main Line but here the canal swings away to the north-west as it heads up to Uxbridge. Here it looks back towards Yiewsley High Street. The towpath is followed by the London LOOP. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5861852 [author] => Marathon [guid] => 5861852 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/43806 [date] => 1533226053 [imageTaken] => 2018-08-01 [dateUpdated] => 1533248711 [tags] => top:Canals?top:Paths?type:Geograph?long distance path:London Loop?towpath [lat] => 51.512156 [long] => -0.474902 [thumb] => https://s0.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/05/86/18/5861852_302f7ac7_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => TQ0580 : The Grand Union Canal at Yiewsley by Marathon [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [13] => stdClass Object ( [title] => TQ0580 : Railway Bridge, West Drayton [description] => The bridge carries the GWR mainline Paddington to Reading and further west over High Street, West Drayton [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5857371 [author] => Richard Rogerson [guid] => 5857371 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/34311 [date] => 1532855747 [imageTaken] => 2018-07-26 [dateUpdated] => 1532883277 [tags] => top:Railways?top:Roads, Road transport?type:Geograph [lat] => 51.509810 [long] => -0.474260 [thumb] => https://s3.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/05/85/73/5857371_ac442340_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => TQ0580 : Railway Bridge, West Drayton by Richard Rogerson [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [14] => stdClass Object ( [title] => TQ0580 : Conveyor [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5787076 [author] => N Chadwick [guid] => 5787076 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/3101 [date] => 1527282956 [imageTaken] => 2017-06-03 [dateUpdated] => 1527352629 [tags] => top:Industry?top:Quarrying, Mining?type:Geograph [lat] => 51.510261 [long] => -0.481306 [thumb] => https://s0.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/05/78/70/5787076_f5fa4a0a_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => TQ0580 : Conveyor by N Chadwick [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) )
  • Station, Suburb, Town
  • 51.53899
  • 0.08042
  • 38.79 kms
  • E
  • Railway Bridge, Station
  • 51.47201
  • -0.25263
  • 16.48 kms
  • ESE
  • Station, Suburb
  • 51.5065
  • -0.0064
  • 32.74 kms
  • E
  • Station, Suburb, Town
  • 51.45156
  • 0.17872
  • 46.14 kms
  • E
  • Foot Bridge, Station
  • 51.50896
  • 0.07179
  • 38.14 kms
  • E
  • Railway Bridge, Station
  • 51.48829
  • -0.10588
  • 26.04 kms
  • E
  • Station, Suburb
  • 51.51331
  • -0.03515
  • 30.73 kms
  • E
  • Quarter, Station
  • 51.47874
  • -0.13626
  • 24.13 kms
  • E
  • Station, Town
  • 51.44329
  • 0.33653
  • 57.09 kms
  • E
  • Station
  • 51.50225
  • 0.03322
  • 35.51 kms
  • E
  • Bridge, Station
  • 51.46688
  • -0.21299
  • 19.27 kms
  • ESE
  • Station, Suburb
  • 51.51059
  • -0.05887
  • 29.1 kms
  • E
  • Station, Suburb
  • 51.503
  • -0.11398
  • 25.33 kms
  • E
  • Station, Suburb
  • 51.53434
  • 0.00779
  • 33.75 kms
  • E