stdClass Object ( [generator] => FeedCreator 1.7.12(BH) [title] => Geograph Britain and Ireland [description] => Images, in 51:31.3693N, 2:35.1670W (40 in total) [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/search.php?i=144115890 [syndicationURL] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/feed/results/144115890.json [nextURL] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/feed/results/144115890/2.json [icon] => https://s1.geograph.org.uk/templates/basic/img/logo.gif [date] => 2021-10-25T04:37:30+00:00 [items] => Array ( [0] => stdClass Object ( [title] => ST5980 : Filton : First Fields Way [description] => Sales and information centre for a new development. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6301493 [author] => Lewis Clarke [guid] => 6301493 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/11775 [date] => 1571679839 [imageTaken] => 2019-10-13 [dateUpdated] => 1571732356 [tags] => top:Business, Retail, Services?type:Geograph [lat] => 51.523286 [long] => -2.588745 [thumb] => https://s1.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/30/14/6301493_29b99615_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => ST5980 : Filton : First Fields Way by Lewis Clarke [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [1] => stdClass Object ( [title] => ST5980 : Filton : First Fields Way [description] => A garden overlooks a plot for future development. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6301492 [author] => Lewis Clarke [guid] => 6301492 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/11775 [date] => 1571679802 [imageTaken] => 2019-10-13 [dateUpdated] => 1571732354 [tags] => top:Suburb, Urban fringe?type:Geograph [lat] => 51.523286 [long] => -2.588745 [thumb] => https://s0.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/30/14/6301492_3edcdae6_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => ST5980 : Filton : First Fields Way by Lewis Clarke [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [2] => stdClass Object ( [title] => ST5980 : Filton : First Fields Way [description] => Houses along a new development in the Filton area. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6301491 [author] => Lewis Clarke [guid] => 6301491 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/11775 [date] => 1571679750 [imageTaken] => 2019-10-13 [dateUpdated] => 1571732353 [tags] => top:Roads, Road transport?type:Geograph [lat] => 51.523469 [long] => -2.588027 [thumb] => https://s3.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/30/14/6301491_6400e06d_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => ST5980 : Filton : First Fields Way by Lewis Clarke [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [3] => stdClass Object ( [title] => ST5980 : Hangar 16U [description] => Filton airfield began operating from 1910. With the advent of the Great War, the site became a hotbed for the embryonic armed forces and this hangar was built in 1917. It is known as 16U, a Belfast type with characteristic wooden latticework prepared in Belfast and shipped over. This system of building was a response to the shortages imposed at the time but became a familiar sight on many British airfields. The hangar was used as a service area for the Royal Flying Corps. It became home to operational R.A.F. aircraft from 1929. During WWII it hosted a number of squadrons, notably 501 - Bristol's pride, the County of Gloucester. Understandably, the whole area of aircraft and manufacturing industries was attacked several times. Fast forward to 2019: the whole airfield is closed to flying and is due to be transformed into what is, in effect, a new town of approximately 10,000 inhabitants. The runway, all 2.5km (8,094 ft) of it, is being ripped up but the old Grade II hangar will remain. It will have a completely new interior that offers a variety of leisure and commercial uses. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6278211 [author] => Neil Owen [guid] => 6278211 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/47623 [date] => 1569536392 [imageTaken] => 2019-09-14 [dateUpdated] => 1569616924 [tags] => top:Air transport?top:Construction, Development?top:Defence, Military?top:Historic sites and artefacts?top:Suburb, Urban fringe?Belfast Hangar?former runway?type:Geograph?subject:hangar [lat] => 51.521148 [long] => -2.584682 [thumb] => https://s3.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/27/82/6278211_af026b61_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => ST5980 : Hangar 16U by Neil Owen [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [4] => stdClass Object ( [title] => ST5980 : Bristol Aerospace Museum - Proteus engine [description] => This is a proteus set up as a turboprop engine. The type first ran on 25th January 1947 and developed 4,445 horsepower from a weight of 1293 kg. An unknown number were built. A Proteus powered power station is preserved at Internal Fire Museum of Power in Wales. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6181529 [author] => Chris Allen [guid] => 6181529 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/4264 [date] => 1560468064 [imageTaken] => 2019-03-09 [dateUpdated] => 1560626108 [tags] => top:Historic sites and artefacts?Filton?gas turbine?type:Inside?subject:machine?museum?turboprop [lat] => 51.523339 [long] => -2.578080 [thumb] => https://s1.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/18/15/6181529_3f8dbfae_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => ST5980 : Bristol Aerospace Museum - Proteus engine by Chris Allen [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [5] => stdClass Object ( [title] => ST5980 : Atomic Bomb Keys [description] => At Bristol Aerospace Museum. A very unusual artefact. The caption reads - "These keys were used to set the WE 177C freefall atomic bomb. A simple type of key, similar to those used to open slot machines of the period, was used to set many of the atomic bombs carried by British V-bombers." A very important link to a bit of cold war history. Also in the museum is an item relating to the modification of Polaris known as Chevaline. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6181448 [author] => Chris Allen [guid] => 6181448 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/4264 [date] => 1560463406 [imageTaken] => 2019-03-09 [dateUpdated] => 1560624465 [tags] => top:Historic sites and artefacts?type:Close Look?Filton?type:Inside?keys?subject:museum?nuclear bomb WE177 [lat] => 51.523338 [long] => -2.578224 [thumb] => https://s0.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/18/14/6181448_fc6cbb44_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => ST5980 : Atomic Bomb Keys by Chris Allen [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [6] => stdClass Object ( [title] => ST5980 : Bristol Aerospace Museum - Brabazon relic [description] => This wheel is claimed to be all that remains of the Bristol Brabazon luxury airliner. Only one was ever completed and first flew on 4 September 1949. It was designed for 12 crew and 100 passengers. The top speed was 300 mph and the range 5,500 miles. The jet liner ensured it was stillborn as the wrong product at the wrong time. A shame as it would have been a fascinating sight with its paired contrarotating propellers. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6180594 [author] => Chris Allen [guid] => 6180594 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/4264 [date] => 1560383306 [imageTaken] => 2019-03-09 [dateUpdated] => 1560497878 [tags] => top:Historic sites and artefacts?type:Inside?subject:museum [lat] => 51.523339 [long] => -2.578080 [thumb] => https://s2.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/18/05/6180594_da46d06a_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => ST5980 : Bristol Aerospace Museum - Brabazon relic by Chris Allen [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [7] => stdClass Object ( [title] => ST5980 : Bristol Aerospace Museum - replica Bristol F.2B [description] => This is a replica of WWI Bristol F.2B fighter plane. This type was present at the inception of the RAF in 1918. This museum houses a Concorde but there is so much more there and if you are interested in transport and engineering it is well worth a half day or more. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6180584 [author] => Chris Allen [guid] => 6180584 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/4264 [date] => 1560381723 [imageTaken] => 2019-03-09 [dateUpdated] => 1560497850 [tags] => top:Historic sites and artefacts?subject:aircraft?Filton?type:Inside?museum?replica aeroplane [lat] => 51.523249 [long] => -2.578079 [thumb] => https://s0.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/18/05/6180584_f5e02a30_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => ST5980 : Bristol Aerospace Museum - replica Bristol F.2B by Chris Allen [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [8] => stdClass Object ( [title] => ST5980 : Housing estate screened by mature trees, Hayes Way [description] => Hayes Way is a busy dual carriageway; these houses are separated from the road by a stream valley and these trees [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6135455 [author] => David Smith [guid] => 6135455 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/708 [date] => 1556486036 [imageTaken] => 2019-04-24 [dateUpdated] => 1556528986 [tags] => top:Housing, Dwellings?top:Suburb, Urban fringe?type:Geograph?subject:housing estate [lat] => 51.522871 [long] => -2.581677 [thumb] => https://s3.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/13/54/6135455_00b0f005_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => ST5980 : Housing estate screened by mature trees, Hayes Way by David Smith [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [9] => stdClass Object ( [title] => ST5980 : Hayes Way, near Filton Airfield [description] => The housing estate is separated from the dual carriageway by a valley [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6135452 [author] => David Smith [guid] => 6135452 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/708 [date] => 1556485845 [imageTaken] => 2019-04-24 [dateUpdated] => 1556528983 [tags] => top:Housing, Dwellings?top:Roads, Road transport?top:Suburb, Urban fringe?type:Geograph?subject:road [lat] => 51.524867 [long] => -2.578243 [thumb] => https://s0.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/13/54/6135452_e20fa1ad_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => ST5980 : Hayes Way, near Filton Airfield by David Smith [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [10] => stdClass Object ( [title] => ST5980 : Hall for Concorde at Aerospace Bristol Collection [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6135432 [author] => David Smith [guid] => 6135432 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/708 [date] => 1556485179 [imageTaken] => 2019-04-24 [dateUpdated] => 1556528954 [tags] => top:Air transport?top:Educational sites?top:Historic sites and artefacts?type:Geograph?subject:museum [lat] => 51.522256 [long] => -2.578787 [thumb] => https://s0.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/13/54/6135432_cc7834f4_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => ST5980 : Hall for Concorde at Aerospace Bristol Collection by David Smith [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [11] => stdClass Object ( [title] => ST5980 : Old and new buildings at Aerospace Bristol museum [description] => On the left is the new hall for Concorde; on the right one of the older buildings at Filton Airfield [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6135430 [author] => David Smith [guid] => 6135430 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/708 [date] => 1556485132 [imageTaken] => 2019-04-24 [dateUpdated] => 1556528952 [tags] => top:Air transport?top:Educational sites?top:Historic sites and artefacts?type:Geograph?subject:museum [lat] => 51.522794 [long] => -2.579082 [thumb] => https://s2.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/13/54/6135430_fa0c1640_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => ST5980 : Old and new buildings at Aerospace Bristol museum by David Smith [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [12] => stdClass Object ( [title] => ST5980 : Aerospace Bristol - Britannia flight deck [description] => This is the forward section of Bristol Britannia G-ALRX. This was the second prototype and due to engine failure was forced to land in the Severn Estuary. The incoming tide rendered it no longer airworthy and it was subsequently used as an on-the-ground training aircraft. The Britannia first flew in 1952, could carry up to 139 passenger, 85 units were built, the top speed was 397 mph and the range was 4,430 miles. The museum is most impressive and although the Concorde is the star the supporting cast is also very interesting. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6090860 [author] => Chris Allen [guid] => 6090860 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/4264 [date] => 1552954179 [imageTaken] => 2019-03-09 [dateUpdated] => 1553029092 [tags] => top:Air transport?top:Historic sites and artefacts?type:Close Look?flight deck?historic aircraft?type:Inside?subject:museum [lat] => 51.523248 [long] => -2.578223 [thumb] => https://s0.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/09/08/6090860_38bbc031_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => ST5980 : Aerospace Bristol - Britannia flight deck by Chris Allen [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [13] => stdClass Object ( [title] => ST5980 : Aerospace Bristol - chance would be a fine thing! [description] => In the forward cabin of Concorde G-BOAF the mach meter and altimeter are displaying Concorde's cruising conditions. In reality we are firmly on the ground. This is a museum well worth the entrance fee if you like big boys' toys and matters engineering. The flight deck is visible beyond behind a glazed panel. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6090843 [author] => Chris Allen [guid] => 6090843 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/4264 [date] => 1552952704 [imageTaken] => 2019-03-09 [dateUpdated] => 1553028853 [tags] => top:Air transport?top:Historic sites and artefacts?type:Close Look?aircraft:Concorde?Filton?type:Inside?subject:museum [lat] => 51.522256 [long] => -2.578787 [thumb] => https://s3.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/09/08/6090843_cb15035a_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => ST5980 : Aerospace Bristol - chance would be a fine thing! by Chris Allen [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) [14] => stdClass Object ( [title] => ST5980 : Aerospace Bristol - flightdeck of Concorde [description] => This is the flight deck of G-BOAF (Alpha Foxtrot) that was the last Concorde to fly in the world. The most striking features are the lack of space and the sheer profusion of dials and switches. Concorde required a three man crew while other modern aeroplanes no longer required a flight engineer. At the aft end of the flight engineer's panel is a narrow gap that in flight opens up to a space big enough to slide a hand in. This is due to expansion as Concorde grew up to 10" in length due to thermal expansion. Elsewhere in the museum is a modern airbus flight deck simulator and the differences are amazing. [link] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6090829 [author] => Chris Allen [guid] => 6090829 [source] => https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/4264 [date] => 1552952038 [imageTaken] => 2019-03-09 [dateUpdated] => 1553028536 [tags] => top:Air transport?type:Close Look?aircraft:Concorde?Filton?flight deck?type:Inside?subject:museum [lat] => 51.522257 [long] => -2.578643 [thumb] => https://s1.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/06/09/08/6090829_ab979c45_120x120.jpg [thumbTag] => ST5980 : Aerospace Bristol - flightdeck of Concorde by Chris Allen [licence] => http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ ) ) )
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